Beyond the Buzz: Guest Post by Kimberly Francisco

beyondthelatest_logo_final

This week I have the last posts in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’ve asked YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see which book librarian Kimberly Francisco from STACKED wants to share… 


Guest post by Kimberly Francisco

biting the sun tanith leeWhen I was a teen, I became enchanted with dystopias, likely prompted by my early love for The Giver. I sought out books in the same vein, which led me to the classics (1984, Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World, Handmaid’s Tale), but there seemed to be a dearth of newer novels written for teens that featured teens.

In 2012, this complaint would be laughed at, but in 2002, I didn’t find much that adequately satisfied my hunger—until I stumbled upon Biting the Sun, a little duology by Tanith Lee.

Biting the Sun is two books in one: Don’t Bite the Sun and its sequel, Drinking Sapphire Wine. It’s set in a future world where consequences no longer really exist. In this world, if you were to die, your consciousness (or soul or life force) would be salvaged from your body and placed in a new body of your own design. For all practical purposes, death no longer exists.

I loved this concept, which seemed so new and fresh to me at the time. I loved how Lee worked with the idea of a consequence-free society, where people could change gender at will, jump from the top of the tallest building just to see what it felt like, walk around with real antennae for a few weeks, hook up with whomever they choose. The society is so technologically advanced that robots do everything for the people, so the people spend their days at leisure, dreaming up new and creative ways to kill themselves and come back in ever more ridiculous-looking bodies.

I figure at the mention of “robots” some of you made the leap to “sentient robots” and figure therein lies the conflict. Happily, that’s not the case. The conflict of the novel has much more to do with how humans—and one human in particular—find meaning in a world without consequences.

The book’s protagonist is a member of the Jang, a group of people similar to what we call teenagers, except the Jang are Jang for several decades instead of just a few years. The Jang are encouraged to act out, to be as wild and crazy as possible—sort of like how teenagers now are expected to act, but the behavior is sanctioned rather than oppressed. The protagonist—whose gender is fluid and is never named, a conceit made easier by the first-person narration—eventually grows weary of the lifestyle and decides to try and work, to find something meaningful to do that will improve the lives of others. When she (at the time) realizes that meaningful work is impossible, she decides to leave the environmentally-sealed world of Four BEE and see what it’s like to live outside.

Aside from not really knowing how to live in the “outside” world, her situation is complicated by the fact that there are those inside Four BEE who plan to do their best to stop her from leaving.

The books were actually published in the 1970s, so they aren’t as new as I thought they were when I first read them. But Lee’s writing and the concept hold up, and the world she’s created still seems fresh and new. She’s created a Jang culture that is believable, sometimes annoying, and weirdly fascinating (much like teen culture today), including a whole new set of slang. I re-read this book every couple of years and find that I continue to love it each time. Moreover, I loved that the ending was so different from the classic dystopias I had read before, all of which almost uniformly ended in despair.

Judging from the age of the reviews on Goodreads, I think Biting the Sun has seen a bit of resurgence lately, thanks to the recent dystopia craze, but I haven’t heard mention of it from anyone that I know or from people whose blogs or reviews I follow. It’s still in print as a mass market omnibus, and I think it fits in well with what’s being published today in this sub-genre (and is more unique and better-written than most of it to boot).

Technically, I believe the book was published for the adult market initially, but it’s a natural fit for teens. It features a teen protagonist, but more than that, it’s about growing up, about deciding who you want to be and in what kind of world you want to live—and then making it happen.

(I also gushed about Biting the Sun in my inaugural post at STACKED, which you can read here.)

Have you read and loved this book? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


stacked logoKimberly Francisco is a public librarian in Texas. While she has many duties, her favorite by far is managing the library’s collection of books and media for children and teens. At STACKED, she blogs about books and other related topics from a librarian’s perspective. You can find her on Goodreads or follow her on Twitter @KimberlyMarieF.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin
  • Librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose recommends New York City novels Kiki Strike, Better Nate Than Ever, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Night Tourist, Suite Scarlett, and Undertown
  • Book blogger and children’s literature MFA student Mackenzi Lee recommends Millions
  • Book columnist and reviewer Colleen Mondor recommends For Liberty
  • Book blogger Kellie at the Re-Shelf recommends Andromeda Klein, The Door in the Hedge, Dramarama, Leverage, I Do, Kill Me Softly, Secret Society Girl, and The Wicked and the Just 
  • Librarian Amber Couch recommends books that get overlooked in her library

Beyond the Buzz: Overactive Imaginations

beyondthelatest_logo_final

This week I have a couple last posts in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Here’s a different take on this question from librarian Amber Couch… 


Guest post by Amber Couch

AmberCrouchMy name is Amber Couch, and I’m a middle school and high school librarian in rural, southwest Virginia. My students are always asking me if I’ve read all the books in the library. Not even close! But I have read a lot, and that made the task of choosing just a few books for this blog post a real challenge. As I walked around my library, I kept saying, “Oooo! I love that book. Wait, no, this one!” Even as I’ve written this post, I’ve changed my mind a few times.

One thing I noticed about all the books was that they really targeted my overactive imagination. In all of them, the author was able to write in such a way that I was transported into the world of the characters. I wish I could live there forever.

AnneofGreenSo, of course, my first book I want to share is Anne of Green Gables. Anne Shirley is the epitome of overactive imaginations, and I was sure she was my absolute bosom friend. Lucy Maud Montgomery set the bar for how I measured all future best friends, and no boy would ever be as wonderful as Gilbert Blythe. Anne and her world made such an impression on me that college papers would be written about her, my best friends had red hair, and even my cat is named after her. Anne lived life with such joy and saw the world as magical. I try to embrace that every day. When students say they want something lighthearted, maybe some adventure or comedy, this is the first book I direct them to.

PreyWhen I got to high school, I started reading a lot of Michael Crichton novels. My biology teacher read Jurassic Park aloud to us when we were learning about genetics, and I was hooked. Michael Crichton scares me! And again, that’s because of my overactive imagination. His books (hopefully) couldn’t actually happen, but they are grounded in enough scientific fact that it makes you wonder. His scariest book, and my favorite, is Prey. This is a story about little nanobots that fly around in swarms and can get under your skin and possess you. The whole time I was reading it there was a buzzing in my ears and my skin was crawling. I would see a swarm of gnats and start wondering if there were actually microscopic robots coming to attack me. It didn’t help that the story took place within a few hours of where I lived. Michael Crichton was able to make the impossible seem almost plausible, which terrified me. When students ask for horror books, I always try to steer them towards his shelf.

FinnikinRecently I read Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta. This is the type of book I wish I could write—fantasy, complete with wizards, magical beasts, sword fights, and princesses never really in distress. It reminded me so much of the books I kept hidden in high school for fear I would be too much of a nerd. Books like The Belgariad by David Eddings, The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan, and The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. To this day I want to believe that somewhere there really is a world where magic is possible, dragons soar through the skies, and knights ride in to save the day. Finnikin is the perfect hero and Melina’s book does a wonderful job of writing action scenes that get your blood pumping and tender scenes to warm your heart. I cry every time I read the ending and fall completely in love with Finnikin. I’m so excited that she has written a sequel, and I can’t wait to start reading my library’s copy. When students want fantasy adventures, this is right where I direct them.

One thing I’ve noticed about the books that get overlooked in my library is that they generally are older. Students want the books with the shiny covers that came out yesterday. If I tell a student that a book was one of my favorites when I was their age, they will generally put it back. The Fudge books by Judy Blume were my life in 4th grade and are still incredibly relevant. But, students don’t seem to be as interested anymore. So, my advice when trying to find a good book is don’t forget about those books that are older. Just because they were written before you were born does not mean they are a boring book. There’s a reason we call them classics, and I think it’s time to start giving that title to more amazing books.

If you have an older book recommendation for me, I would love to hear it. You can find me on twitter: @acouchwriter.


beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin
  • Librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose recommends New York City novels Kiki Strike, Better Nate Than Ever, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Night Tourist, Suite Scarlett, and Undertown
  • Book blogger and children’s literature MFA student Mackenzi Lee recommends Millions
  • Book columnist and reviewer Colleen Mondor recommends For Liberty
  • Book blogger Kellie at the Re-Shelf recommends Andromeda Klein, The Door in the Hedge, Dramarama, Leverage, I Do, Kill Me Softly, Secret Society Girl, and The Wicked and the Just 

Beyond the Buzz: The Re-Shelf Take

beyondthelatest_logo_final

This week I have a couple last posts in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see which books Kellie from the Re-Shelf wants to share… 


Guest post by Kellie

When Nova contacted me about doing a guest blog for her Beyond (the Latest) Buzz series about “overlooked” books, I instantly had concerns.

No. That’s not true. I was instantly flattered, excited, and thrilled to be asked.

But then I started thinking about what an overlooked book IS and then the concerns began. Are we talking within the last year? Within my lifetime (a time that included a barren YA wasteland [at least where I lived] and a subsequent YA boom that continues to grow and expand)? Of all time? And what does “overlooked” mean? Less than 100 reviews on GoodReads? The title is on a backlist? Didn’t win an award OR sit atop the bestsellers list?

Clearly, I have an issue with overthinking things.

Nova had this all planned out, though, and gave a huge amount of flexibility of how to view the series and the books. Basically, these are books we think should get some more attention.

That all squared away, I…still couldn’t decide what time period to talk about. So I made an executive decision! Cover them ALL. (Sort of.)

Ye Olde Books of Yore That May Have Been Forgotten Books

hedgeThe Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley. 

This may or may not be the book that spurned a passion for fairytale retellings in my life. I still haven’t found a new version of The Twelve Dancing Princesses that I like more than McKinley’s take on the matter. All four short stories included in this set are wonderful and may incur a desire to take advantage of alllllllllllll the retellings that have been pubbed lately.

idoAny book by Elizabeth Chandler.

For real. While her Kissed by an Angel series is pretty well known (and recently got a bit of a reboot with a sequel trilogy), my personal faves that I revisit year in and year out are from a series called “Love Stories.” Does anyone besides me remember these? Basically, it was a bunch of non-connected love stories written by a HUGE number of authors and sold under the series title. Chandler wrote a few but my particular favorites are I Do and At First Sight. I still get a little swoony thinking about those two. These aren’t published anymore, but if you see one in a used bookstore or your stacks—GRAB IT.

GoodReads Tells Me Less Than 500 People Have Read These Books and I Don’t Understand Why Books

andromedaAndromeda Klein by Frank Portman

Okay, if I’m honest, I find this to be a love-it or hate-it book. Personally, I adore Portman’s sophomore novel. Andromeda is a quirky, intense character and has Very Strong opinions as to how libraries run. Additionally, I learned a boatload from this book—about the occult, tarot cards, and inner-ear problems.

leverageLeverage by Joshua C. Cohen

Okay, Cohen’s debut has 562 GoodReads ratings [768 now, as of this posting! —NRS]. BUT STILL. Not enough. And while the material is intense, dark and, at times, tough to get through, the friendships in this book are unique and different and fascinating. Plus it puts an entirely different spin on sports books, bullying, and revenge.

A Decent Number of People Have Read These Books, but Not Enough for Me Because I’m Greedy Books

 

dramaDramarama by E. Lockhart

I am a theatre nerd. Like, for serious. And I’ve always felt this Lockhart novel gets lost amongst her other awesome novels. I also harbor a distinct affection for the gorg cover. That said, when reader’s advisory was a huge part of my job, I constantly used this book as a go-to read for many a-customers looking for a good read.

secretSecret Society Girl by Diana Peterfreund

I have to give credit where credit is due: the only reason I know about this series of books (of which SSG is the first) is Leila at Bookshelves of Doom. Most places categorize them as adult fiction—the MC is in college—but I think they fit just as happily in the upper-YA range. I came for the secret societies, but I stayed for the interesting friendship dynamics, complex characters and storylines, and big, swoon-worthy moments.

Books from Last Year I Want Everyone to Read Books

wickedThe Wicked and the Just by J. Anderson Coats

This is a very recent read for me and I was positively swept away by it. The historical details. The juxtaposition of our two MCs. Wales. 13th Century. Ugh. Loved it. Loved. It.

softlyKill Me Softly by Sarah Cross

Since we started with fairytale retellings, let’s end with one. In KMS, people are forced to live fairytale stories out in real time. This can be as lovely as finding the Beast to your Beauty or as awful as realizing the designated Beast is also the misogynist dude from high school. I loved how Cross played this story out and how she translated actions/characters from fairy tales into present-day reality. Such a fascinating new take on retellings that had me dwelling on the concept for days.

And that’s all she wrote. From The Re-Shelf, anyway. There will be way more hidden gems revealed throughout this series and I cannot wait to see them revealed!

Thanks for having me, Nova!

Have you read and loved these books? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


teaKellie makes her Internet home over at The Re-Shelf, where she reviews books—usually late at night. She is an academic librarian by trade and delights in all things entertainment. After a year living in Alaska, she firmly defines herself as an “indoor girl.” Currently, she is nursing obsessions with Sleep No More; She’s So Mean by Matchbox Twenty; Pitch Perfect; and dystopian novels. One day soon she plans on running away to New York City. Her dream is to be a one-hit wonder. You can also find her on the twitter.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin
  • Librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose recommends New York City novels Kiki Strike, Better Nate Than Ever, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Night Tourist, Suite Scarlett, and Undertown
  • Book blogger and children’s literature MFA student Mackenzi Lee recommends Millions
  • Book columnist and reviewer Colleen Mondor recommends For Liberty

Beyond the Buzz: Guest Post by Colleen Mondor

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Today I have more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see which book columnist and reviewer Colleen Mondor wants to share… 


Guest post by Colleen Mondor

For LibertyMy son has nurtured a borderline obsession with the Revolutionary War for several years now (he is eleven) and because of that I am constantly on the alert for unusual books that will pique his ever-growing interest. Timothy Decker’s For Liberty: The Story of the Boston Massacre covers one of the most commonly known aspects of the revolutionary period. There are few Americans who can not recount the events on the street corner in Boston that led to the deaths of five colonists, the trial of British redcoats and the infamous engraving by Paul Revere. The Boston Massacre is one of the key steps on the road to war and while a traditional subject for historians of the period, it is not one that you would expect to receive a unique treatment in a book for children. That is why Decker’s book is so outstanding and one that I just can’t recommend enough.

For Liberty is certainly a picture book—Decker’s evocative pencil drawings fill the pages from nearly corner to corner. But when you refer to a title as a “picture book,” readers immediately fall back on favorite images from the books of their childhood and relegate a title to that category—something to be read to the youngest of children. In the case of For Liberty this likely means readers of a much older age have missed something significant and that is truly a shame.

In the opening pages, Decker lays out the facts leading up to the confrontation, explaining why the colonists were angry with their government and why British soldiers had come to walk the streets of Boston. “By March 5, 1770,” he writes, “it was dangerous to be a soldier in Boston.” He names the specific soldiers involved, and how they came together in the presence of a mob on King Street. The pictures show the anger of the men and boys who were tired of the military presence in their lives and they show the growing uncertainty of the soldiers, no longer certain the civilians would go home. Finally a shot is fired, which “surprised everyone.” The British Captain Preston was struck by a club as he turned to investigate the shot and as he fell all control was lost. More shots were fired and Decker shows Crispus Attucks, the first man to die in the Revolution, struck by a bullet. Preston restored order but the damage was done and in a bare overhead shot, Decker shows the fallen men, spread over the square. The Boston Massacre was over.

massacre-drawing-pen-point

(From TimothyDecker.com. Click the image for more about the book.)

In the final pages, For Liberty becomes even more intense. The soldiers were taken into custody, lawyers were hired to prosecute them and John Adams, future president, was chosen to lead the defense. Captain Preston was found innocent, as no one could state he had ordered his troops to fire. In the trial for the soldiers, John Adams was eloquent and determined and Decker uses his words in the text, allowing history to speak far deeper than any modern writer could. He closes with a stirring profile of John Adams who “knew that liberty was precious and required wise, vigilant and reasonable citizens to protect it, even, at times, from the ignorance of one’s own countrymen.” Decker thus reveals John Adams, the president situated between two of Mt Rushmore’s great men, as one of our greatest founding fathers. He made the case before we were America, that the word of law would matter; that power would not usurp truth. He was one of our better angels and in this understated, classy and powerful book, he is given the respect he so richly deserves. For Liberty is not the Boston Massacre story you learned in school, it is far better and utterly unforgettable. Timothy Decker has really done something special with this one and readers, of any age, who come across it are luckier for the experience.

Have you read and loved this book? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


Colleen Mondor

Colleen Mondor is the author of The Map of My Dead Pilots: The Dangerous Game of Flying in Alaska. She is also the longtime YA columnist for Bookslut and a reviewer for Booklist.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin
  • Librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose recommends New York City novels Kiki Strike, Better Nate Than Ever, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Night Tourist, Suite Scarlett, and Undertown
  • Book blogger and children’s literature MFA student Mackenzi Lee recommends Millions

Beyond the Buzz: Guest Post by Mackenzi Lee

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Today I have more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see which title blogger and children’s literature MFA student Mackenzi Lee wants to share… 


Guest post by Mackenzi Lee

MillionsI don’t know if you can count a book that has been made into a movie1 as being “Beyond the Buzz,” but Millions has been one of my standard recommendations for years, and I’ve never encountered anyone who has met my enthusiastic adoration with a similarly vigorous “I love that book!”

So here we go. One more step in my life-long quest to make the world appreciate the genius of this quiet little novel.

Millions is the story of two brothers—worldly, real-estate-savvy Anthony and pious Damian, the narrator, who, at ten years old, strives to emulate the lives of the saints. In the wake of their mother’s death, the two boys and their dad are trying to start over—new city, new school, new house. And one September morning, in the backyard of that new house, the two boys find a bag containing one million pounds2.

With only seventeen days before Europe switches to the Euro and the money becomes worthless, the brothers can’t agree on how to spend it. Anthony wants to buy what our narrator deems “worldly goods,” while Damian wants to give the money to the poor in order to become more saint-like himself. However, the boys quickly discover that there are dangerous men looking for the lost money, and they will stop at nothing to get it back—even if it means taking out Anthony and Damian in the process.

There is no way for me to make a concise list detailing what I love about this book. I love Britishness of it. I love Damian’s voice. I love that I now have a vast and almost useless3 knowledge of the lives of saints because of this book. I love that I laugh every time I read it4. I love that I cry every time I read it. But mostly, I love that what is on the surface a heist story about two kids irresponsibly spending a lot of money, is really about how people move on in the wake of a tragedy. I love that this is not a novel about grief, and yet the theme is subtly and deftly implanted on every page of the novel.

I have read this book dozens of times—growing up, it was my family’s go-to audio book for road trips5. I have since reread it on my own, and even done papers for school on it. I am amazed by how each time I read this book, I feel like I get another layer of it. What I at first thought was simply a feel-good novel has become a feel-everything novel. This is a book for anyone who has ever lost someone they loved. For anyone who has ever wanted to be better. For anyone who has ever been bullied because they were being themselves. For anyone who has been misunderstood. For anyone who has lived without excellence and known they could be better.

But mostly, Millions is for anyone who loves that magical, transportive power of magnificent books. It is a quirky and delightful novel that I will keep reading again and again. Before I die, I will probably read it a million times6.

  1. Albeit only a mildly successfully one.
  2. As in British money, because that is where this book takes place. Not as in “one million pounds of…” and then I forgot to include the last word, leaving you in suspense.
  3. Though I did once dominate the “saints” category of play-at-home Jeopardy. So not totally useless, I guess.
  4. In what other novel do you find a fourth-grade boy who receives visitations from chain-smoking saints?
  5. Side note—the audio book is extraordinary. Highly recommended.
  6. Ahhhh!! Bad pun, bad pun! Sorry guys, last lines are hard!

Have you read and loved this book? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


Mackenzi Lee author photoMackenzi Lee is currently earning an MFA in writing for children and young adults at Simmons College, meaning that someday she hopes to pay back her student loans on the lucrative salary of a young adult author. She loves sweater weather, diet coke, and Shakespeare. On a perfect day, she can be found enjoying all three. She blogs at mackenzilee.wordpress.com, sometimes about books, sometimes about Boston, and sometimes about Benedict Cumberbatch.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin
  • Librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose recommends New York City novels Kiki Strike, Better Nate Than Ever, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, The Night Tourist, Suite Scarlett, and Undertown

Beyond the Buzz: New York City Reading Recommendations from Laura Lutz

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Welcome to the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Since today happens to be Valentine’s Day, and I love New York City like wow, I thought this would be the perfect day to feature this particular guest post. Read on to see which titles librarian and children’s literature professor Laura Lutz from Pinot and Prose wants to share with us about the city she loves… 


Guest post by Laura Lutz

There are a number of subjects about which I’m passionate: children’s and YA books (naturally), food, wine, travel, and New York. When I examined my short list of books to talk about here, I found that, unintentionally, many of the books featured New York as a setting. So I’m going with that as the theme that ties my guest blog post together.

It got me thinking: what it is about New York that catches the imagination of so many? I once read—I believe Adam Gopnik said it—that there’s something about New York that kids and teens tap into: they get it. As a native Californian, I never thought in a million years I would ever live here but, serendipitously, I ended up moving here when I turned 30…and I’ve never looked back. Sure, there’s the hustle and bustle, the cabs, the trains, the excitement and action. But there’s also these lovely quiet places: the riverfront, the little alleys, the hidden cemeteries, the variety of parks. There’s the promise of endless possibility, of magic, of fear, of adventure. Like any large city, New York is an ideal (just like Paris, or London) and an icon.

So let’s talk about some of my favorite NYC-based stories:

Better Nate Than EverFresh on the scene—it went on sale in February—is Better Nate Than Ever (S&S, 2013) by Tim Federle. Eighth grader Nate dreams about nothing else but escaping Jankburg, Pennsylvania, and getting to NYC for the auditions of the upcoming Broadway play, E.T.: The Musical. He gets to New York, of course, where his eyes are opened to a whole new world: everything moves so fast! Everyone has an iPhone! Everyone stays up all night! Everyone has a shrink! And two men can really openly kiss in NYC?! I so hope the world will fall in love with Nate as much as I have!

Night TouristNext up is The Night Tourist (Hyperion, 2007) by Katherine Marsh. I’m not sure why this series didn’t take off as much as Percy Jackson, but it’s a shame because it’s every bit as good, if not better. Ninth grader Jack meets a mysterious girl, Euri, in Grand Central Terminal…and, with her, discovers an underworld below New York. Jack thinks this could be his chance to see his deceased mother again but, as he learns more about Euri and the underworld, he realizes that he may be there for another purpose. This is so suspenseful, so well thought-out, so action-packed. Marsh followed it up (just as well) with The Twilight Prisoner (Hyperion, 2009).

(US edition)

(US edition)

(UK edition)

(UK edition)

It’s questionable whether this is considered an overlooked book because, I daresay, most school and library folks are familiar with it. But Kiki Strike: Inside the Shadow City (Bloomsbury, 2006) by Kirsten Miller is a particular favorite. Bad-ass teen girls who’ve been booted from Girl Scouts for being too edgy and smart? Yeah, that’s my kind of story. The third book in the series was published in January 2013. (Note on the cover: I think the British version is so much cooler than the American—what do you think?)

Suite ScarlettAnother personal favorite of mine is Suite Scarlett (Scholastic, 2008) about a smart, spunky girl, Scarlett, whose family owns the Hopewell, an art deco hotel in Manhattan. No one does realistic fiction quite like Maureen Johnson; her teenager voice is dead-on and she’s wickedly funny. The publisher’s own description does this book justice: “Before the summer is over, Scarlett will have to survive a whirlwind of thievery and romantic missteps. But in the city where anything can happen, she just might be able to pull it off.” Oh, New York, New York. The sequel is Scarlett Fever (Scholastic, 2010).

Nick and NorahBefore I sign off, there are two more books I can’t resist mentioning. The first isn’t in danger of being buzz-free: Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist (Random House, 2006) by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan. It’s the ultimate Teens Run Wild for One Night in Manhattan and the World Is Their Oyster tale. It’s witty, provocative, and touching—if you haven’t read it, what are you waiting for?!

UndertownThe second book is upcoming and I haven’t had a chance to read it yet: Undertown (Amulet, March 2013) by Melvin Jules Bukiet. Two middle schoolers end up on a boat, falling through a hole in a construction site in Manhattan. Of course, they explore the underworld of New York in a rollicking adventure. Looking forward to reading this one (and isn’t that cover fantastic?).

Thanks, everyone, for letting me share my fave NYC books for kids and teens! Feel free to share your favorites in the comments—there were too many for me to mention them all!

Have you read and loved these books? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


Laura Lutz author photoLaura Lutz is a librarian, children’s literature professor, and consultant. She’s also a home cook, wine enthusiast, mix-CD-maker, and living room dancer. She blogs about food at Pinot and Prose, tweets at foodandbooks, and spends way too much time on Pinterest and Instagram.

 

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends UltravioletA Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels
  • Book blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens recommends The Lost Years of Merlin

Beyond the Buzz: Guest Post by Nicole from WORD for Teens

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Welcome to the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see what titles blogger Nicole from WORD for Teens wants to share with us today… 


Guest post by Nicole

I was staring at my shelves for a good half hour in an attempt to find the proper book to write this post about. What book do I think is overlooked?

Eyes Like StarsPerchance to DreamSo Silver Bright

There were the ones that were known in the blogging community but seemed hidden from everybody else, like Lisa Mantchev’s beautiful Theatre Illuminata series.

Bloody Jack 1Bloody Jack 3Bloody Jack 2

Then there were the ones that sell well, but nobody I talk to seems to have read them despite how much I adore them, like L.A. Meyer’s hilarious historical Bloody Jack series.

The Lost Years of MerlinBut at least people knew about both of those. They hadn’t been overlooked too badly. So I sat and I thought and I browsed my bookcase, and I sat and I thought and I looked at my books some more. And then I realized I was overlooking the most overlooked books on my shelf: The Lost Years of Merlin series by T. A. Barron.

I’ve never been able to figure out why so few people have read this series. The writing is absolutely breathtaking; the characters are fabulous and all of them are memorable; the world, the world, the world! is amazing. Fincayara was the number one on my top ten most vivid fictional settings.

Maybe it’s because T.A. Barron doesn’t have much of an online presence—he’s not on Twitter and doesn’t update his Facebook or his blog that often. I had the chance to meet him when I was younger and he’s an absolute sweetheart, and when I played his games on his website he sent me signed posters of the maps of Fincayara. (He’s awesome.)

Maybe it’s the fact that it’s a high fantasy Arthurian legend retelling. Or it didn’t have a big marketing push. Or the fact that the series is quite a few years old at this point, with two spin-off series attached to it.

The Lost Years of Merlin 2But regardless of why it hasn’t been read, it should be read. The Lost Years of Merlin starts off with a young boy named Emrys—and anybody who knows anything about Arthurian legend knows that Emrys will grow up to be the infamous sorcerer Merlin. The young boy has to deal with a whole slew of issues, from not knowing who his father is to not fitting in his town, before he ends up on the lost isle of Fincayara. Fincyara, the world-between-worlds, is currently under the thumb of a ruler who Rhita Gawr, an evil god, has converted to his side. Emrys, with the help of a few friends and the blessings of the god Dagda (yay, Celtic mythology!) needs to help bring Fincayara back to order.

And is the lost-boy-saves-the-world plot a bit of a stereotype for the fantasy genre? Of course! But it’s so well done here, and I don’t know why people are avoiding it, especially you fantasy lovers. I see you sitting there at your computer, reading this, going, Hmm, maybe I should pick it up. Well, put down your Mercedes Lackey and your Christopher Paolini or whatever it is you’re favoring at the moment and go give Barron’s books a try.

Trust me, you won’t regret it.

Have you read and loved this series? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


Nicole word for teens headshotNicole blogs over at WORD for Teens. She has blonde hair and a love of dragons. The rest changes without notice. For stalkage purposes, you can find her on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr.

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more
  • Book blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden recommends Ultraviolet, A Certain Slant of Light, and The Reapers Are the Angels

Beyond the Buzz: Reading Recommendations from Wendy Darling (+Giveaway)

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Welcome to the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see what titles blogger Wendy Darling from The Midnight Garden wants to share with us today… 

Scroll down for an announcement of the giveaway winner!


Guest post by Wendy Darling

It’s easy to catch someone’s attention with a gorgeous cover, a bestseller stamp of approval, or a splashy marketing campaign. But some of the books I’ve loved best over the past few years have been hidden gems, so I was pleased when Nova invited me to write about books that I felt deserved to find a wider audience.

The following books, both YA and beyond, are ones that have surprised me and moved me in unexpected ways. They all feature young women at a crucial point in self-discovery, so they’re titles that I am constantly recommending to open-minded YA readers who want to try something a little different.

UltravioletUltraviolet by R. J. Anderson (Carolrhoda Lab)

What if you were locked in a mental institute because you were accused of murdering your classmate? That is where Alison Jeffries’ story begins, but the mystery behind her friend’s missing body takes you to unimaginable places as you get to know the remarkable heroine. Written in gorgeous prose, this book is filled with unexpected twists and turns, and might even remind you of beloved speculative authors such as Madeleine L’Engle.

a-certain-slant-of-light-book-coverA Certain Slant of Light by Laura Whitcomb (Graphia)

Helen is a ghost who has inhabited different human bodies for over a hundred years. This unusual story is slow, sad, and involves questionable ethics that often makes it a fairly polarizing read. I love the originality of the concept and the keenness of the emotion, however, as well as the complex, literary style of the author’s writing.

the reapers are the angelsThe Reapers Are the Angels by Alden Bell (Holt Paperbacks)

In a post-apocalyptic world, survivors wander the earth in search of food…and doing their best to avoid zombies. The interesting thing is, this isn’t your typical genre thriller—it’s certainly gruesome in parts, with tricky dialect and violent imagery–but it’s also touched with unexpected beauty and deep feeling.

There’s a thrill of discovery that comes with every book that moves us as readers, but when the stars align for a book that hasn’t gotten as much attention, it’s especially satisfying to be able to share them with friends. Thanks so much to Nova for giving us the opportunity to spread the love!

Have you read and loved these books? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


GIVEAWAY WINNER ANNOUNCED…

One commenter on this post won a Hidden Gem!

a-certain-slant-of-light-book-coverthe reapers are the angelsUltraviolet 

Wendy hand-picked one lucky winner from the comments below, and the winner is…

Courtney Leigh!

Who said: 

As many have said, these all look like books I’d severely enjoy, but your description of A Certain Slant of Light snagged my attention above the other two. “This story…involves questionable ethics that often makes it a fairly polarizing read.”

I will read any and all YA, but the ones that tend to stick with me and force me to think about them long after I finish the last sentence are the ones where there is no hero or heroine. Where the main character makes bad, misguided, even cruel choices. I want to find out if they change or learn or regret. I want to know how they come to terms with themselves, if they ever do. I want to see all the inescapable repercussions.

But wait! Then you throw in a ghost and a “complex, literary style”? I am absolutely sold. Even if I don’t receive the giveaway, I will be purchasing this book. Thanks for all the recs!

Congrats, Courtney! You won a copy of A Certain Slant of Light! Thank you to Wendy for offering up the giveaway—and to everyone who entered!


Wendy Darling never stopped reading children’s and young adult books, and believes you shouldn’t either. If you’re a kindred spirit, please feel free to connect with her on her blog The Midnight Garden, GoodReads, Twitter, and Facebook.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 
  • Book blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction recommends books including Freefall, I Swear, Like Mandarin, and more

Beyond the Buzz: Reading Recommendations from Kari Olson

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Welcome to the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series, where I’m asking YA & kidlit librarians as well as book bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. Read on to see what titles blogger Kari Olson from A Good Addiction wants to share with us today…


Guest post by Kari Olson

When I heard Nova was doing this series, I jumped on it. I love recommending books, and I oftentimes do feel like much of what I fall in love with are things not many other people are reading, much less have heard about. While there are a ton of books I’ve liked, even loved, the ones I really push on people are the ones that have changed me. The ones that have made me step back and think about things, that have challenged my way of thinking and pushed me beyond my comfort zone.

I’m a big fan of lists, and while I want everyone to read these books, I don’t want to give away the bigger elements of them, or explain how I saw the characters grow and change. I want people to go into it as innocently as I did, for the full impact. So here’s my top picks of books I think deserve more reads, with the highlights of what made me fall head over heels for them.

FreefallFreefall by Mindi Scott

Freefall was a favorite of 2010, and is still a favorite of mine. I adore Seth, and kind of claim to be his biggest fan. But what got me with this book is how almost normal it is. Yes, Seth is dealing with losing his best friend, but more than anything, he is just trying to figure life out. From his family situation, to his past with girls, to Rosetta, the girl who is really giving him reason to want to change, there is just something so endearing about him and what he goes through.

I SwearI Swear by Lane Davis

Honestly, this is one of the best bullying books I’ve read. I loved the characters, I hated them. I felt so much with this one. And couldn’t stop thinking about it for days. This isn’t a book where everyone walks away happy, nor is it one that will necessarily leave the reader completely happy, but oh, man, the journey is so worth it and this one will definitely challenge you.

LeverageLeverage by Joshua C. Cohen

This is the other book that sits in the best bullying books category. This one is so intense, and gritty, and definitely not for everyone. It’s truly gutting at times. But it is honestly one of the single most powerful and impacting books I have ever read—a book split in perspective between two boys who completely stand out as narrators.

Like MandarinLike Mandarin by Kirsten Hubbard

Apart from the stunning writing, what got me with this book was how intense the relationship is between Grace and Mandarin. What also got me was how it took me about two days after I finished to realize… there’s no romance in this one. Yeah, Mandarin has guys. But there isn’t a love interest, for her or Grace. Because there doesn’t need to be one. Grace experiences so much, goes through so much, without a boy needing to drive it.

Invincible SummerInvincible Summer by Hannah Moskowitz

This one kind of broke me, had me sobbing, and left me thinking about it for weeks. The voice is absolutely perfect in this one, and especially the way Chase changes not only during the book, but from one summer to the next, both just growing up and because of what’s going on.

CompromisedCompromised by Heidi Ayarbe

Whenever you drive by homeless people, even teens, on the street, what is your thought? Drugs? Laziness? Neither of those is the case for Maya, or the allies she finds along the way. This book is not an easy or light read. There is nothing held back in this one, and Maya is such a great character, torn between anger and love, courage and fear. Even better, the changes Maya and the others go through isn’t just because they have to grow up fast living on the streets, but because they still have what led them there to contend with.

Take Me ThereTake Me There by Carolee Dean

This is another book that is impossible to explain why I like it without giving away spoilers. The ending is one of the single most impacting, memorable ones I’ve ever read. The story has a drive and push to it that kept me gripped, and even over two years later, I still remember a ton of scenes and specifics of this book. With a light romantic element mixed into bigger family and friend elements, this one has just enough easy moments to relieve you in all the rest of what’s going on.

Have you read and loved these books? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


Headshot with TobyKari Olson is a YA writer represented by Pam van Hylckama Vlieg of Larsen Pomada, and has been fangirling about books at A Good Addiction since 2009. She also reviews at Bookalicious.org and Brazen Reads, and formerly The {Teen} Book Scene. She’s the owner of a stubborn beagle/basset mix named Toby, and is a fan of all things boys, abs, and coffee. She lives in Texas and works in medicine.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God
  • YA librarian Abby Johnson recommends the top five books she read this year: The Berlin Boxing Club; Blizzard of Glass; Dogtag Summer; Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have; and A Girl Named Faithful Plum 

Beyond the Buzz: Reading Recommendations from Abby the Librarian

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Welcome to a new series here on distraction no. 99 called Beyond the (Latest) Buzz. I’ve asked YA & kidlit librarians and bloggers to share books they think deserve more attention. And I asked them specifically because, of all readers in the know, librarians and book bloggers are some of the most passionate readers we have in this industry, they read a TON more books than I do, and maybe, if I asked nicely, they’d be eager to recommend some beloved books with us here? They were—and they did.

Read on to see what books Abby the Librarian wants to share with us today…


Guest post by Abby Johnson

Sometimes good books go unnoticed, but as bloggers we have the right—nay, the responsibility!—to give awesome books the push they deserve. Today, I’ve got my top five books I’ve read this year that did not get the buzz they deserve! If you’re looking for a great read, I hope one of these books will strike your fancy.

berlinboxingThe Berlin Boxing Club by Robert Sharenow (HarperTeen, 2011)

What’s it about? Karl Stern, a fourteen-year-old Jewish boy, takes boxing lessons to fend off attacks from the Hitler Youth boys at his school, but as violence against the Jews escalates, Karl must use his skills to protect his family.

Why should you pick it up? Have you ever felt like someone didn’t like you because of their idea of you? You’ll totally see eye-to-eye with Karl. He doesn’t even really feel Jewish. His family’s not religious, he never did anything to those guys, but they hate him just the same. Plus, the oppression of Nazi Germany is palpable and it builds and builds as things get worse. And also: World War II! Sports!

blizzardBlizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917 by Sally M. Walker (Henry Holt Books for Young Readers, 2011)

What’s it about? Halifax was never the same after the 1917 explosion of the Mont-Blanc, the largest man-made explosion EVER until the 1945 detonation of the atomic bomb.

Why should you pick it up? Sally M. Walker manages to put the reader right there, getting to know families and people going about their business in Halifax when the ship exploded. There’s been a lot of talk about the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic this year and if that’s something that interests you, I think you’ll be fascinated by the little-known story of this massive maritime disaster, too.

DogtagSummer final coverDogtag Summer by Elizabeth Partridge (Bloomsbury USA, 2011)

What’s it about? Tracy, a half-Vietnamese girl who was rescued from war-torn Vietnam and adopted when she was seven, struggles to find her place and to piece together memories of her childhood.

Why should you pick it up? This is a coming of age story made even more poignant by the lush California scenery and the historical detail of the Vietnam war time period. Not only is Tracy dealing with the impending first day of junior high and buying her first bra, she’s trying to figure out why her veteran dad won’t talk about the war and why her parents seem to hate her best friend’s family. It’s like Judy Blume but with a half-Vietnamese girl.

food_girls_and_other_things_i_can't_have_paperbackFood, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have by Allen Zadoff (Egmont USA, 2009)

What’s it about? When Andy, a 300-pound sophomore geek, meets new girl April, he goes out for the football team to impress her, and ends up changing everything.

Why should you pick it up? Andy’s story of reinvention shows the importance of being who you really want to be and not letting anyone stop you. Plus, it’s funny. Plus, it has little short chapters and a totally readable style. You’ll like Andy and you’ll root for him all the way through. Oh and: football!

FaithfulPlumA Girl Named Faithful Plum: A True Story of a Dancer from China and How She Achieved Her Dream by Richard Bernstein (Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2011)

What’s it about? This is the true story of Zhongmei Lei, a girl who left her home and family at the tender age of eleven to audition for the prestigious Beijing Dance Academy and, despite prejudice from the teachers and other students, would not let anything keep her from her dream of becoming a dancer.

Why should you pick it up? Okay, to get to the auditions, Zhongmei had to take a train for over 1,000 miles. At the auditions, the teachers would select 12 girls and 12 boys. From ALL OF CHINA. Zhongmei’s a girl with determination, is what I’m saying. And her story is inspirational. If you’re the type to watch So You Think You Can Dance or if you dig performance stories like Bunheads by Sophie Flack or Rival by Sara Bennett Wealer, this is a book for you.

And there you have it! Five books that have flown relatively under the radar. Each of these books has less than 1,000 reviews on GoodReads (comparatively, The Hunger Games has over 1 million reviews on GoodReads). So pick one up today!

Have you read and loved these books? Chime in and tell us what you think in the comments! 


abby

Abby Johnson is a children’s librarian in Southern Indiana. You can find her on the web at abbythelibrarian.com.

beyondthelatest_logo_final

Want more in the Beyond the (Latest) Buzz series?

Here are the posts in the series so far:

  • YA/middle-school librarian Jennifer Hubert Swan recommends Better Than Running at Night and Every Time a Rainbow Dies
  • YA librarian Kelly Jensen recommends a whole host of books including Sorta Like a Rock StarFirst Day on EarthFrost, and more
  • Youth services librarian Liz Burns recommends The President’s Daughter, Flora Segunda, and All Unquiet Things
  • YA librarian Angie Manfredi recommends Rats Saw God (Giveaway open until December 26!)